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Archive for August, 2008

Driller Killer

Posted by Josh Samford On August - 26 - 2008
Originally written by Prof. Aglaophotis


Plot Outline: Reno Miller is a man clinging to a shoe string; living in his New York apartment as an exceptional painter with his two girl friends Carol and Pamela with a number of mounting problems, particularly their attrition of money, lack of support from his art dealer coupled with the pressure of completing his current painting, the heavy bill to pay with poverty looming over their backs, the non-stop practices of the new punk band downstairs…the list of problems just goes on for Reno. Under this sort of pressure, there seems to be no way Reno can ventilate his emotions, much less direct his anger. That is of course, after Reno starts to fulfill his new found infatuation, for after helping Pamela drill a hole in one of the doors, Reno gained this hidden desire with drills…so much to the point that he slowly begins to lose his mind from the pressure and begins burning out his rage by using the power drill on the local street paupers. But how far will Reno go once his problems reach their negative zenith?


  


The Review
I have always loved a good character study in whatever I read or watch; it proves that a human being can use their imagination to its fullest lucidity in order to bring a fictional character to life, especially in a psychological manner. Although I knew I was in for a character study with a unique blend of visual artistry in Driller Killer, I felt amazed at witnessing the spectacle of a man trying to live out his imagination only to find that it cannot reach its expected potential due to suppressed feelings that shatter his social control, leading to detrimental behavior as a sole outlet and that is one of the many things I enjoyed about The Driller Killer. I first heard of this movie from Pantsman over the horror forum and as blasé as the title sounded, the more I read about it, the more intriguing it became to my mind. There is practically nothing you can’t find symbolic or meaningful to life in this movie, as ambiguous/long winded shots can easily be inferred and interpreted in ways that, no matter which direction they are taken either in the obviously new-found phallic/homoerotic obsession or the elimination of negative figures that are held equal to the character’s father, hit pretty damn close to home. What blows me away about this character is how realistic he and his situation really are; it may just be a horror movie, but it has its share of reality in mind. As most people try to chase their dreams and ambitions, some will grab hold to nightmares as they already struggle desperately to the life they already lead and how Abel’s character Reno finds his way to vent and lash out is deeply effective as you can see anyone with enough suppression in their lives to find a different way out on their own a harrowing ordeal and that is what really makes the movie stand out.

The audio quality in the movie was just about average, as keeping the volume too low makes lighter toned dialogue sound like murmurs and keeping it too high might throw you back into your seat (unless you have a stable surround sound system so that not every word is channeled in a seemingly singular solid direction). The soundtrack was interesting enough to keep the audience somewhat drawn in as we get a few synthesized tracks that reflect Reno’s drilling sprees with some industrial sound pounds and an almost Jaws/guitar-twang feel to it, teeming with some tribal chase-inducing drumbeats. The punk band contributes to the audio and soundtrack as well, as the sound of the band practicing and playing on stage sound raw enough to emit the feeling of actually standing in front of the band in a stuffy closed up room, the bass lines and heavy voice of the singer over the microphone and the drum beats throbbing against your body and banging against your ears, making their incessant role in the movie boost up enough so that the audience sort of feels for the struggling Reno (I should know; I used to have a band playing my garage). The cinematography was quite effective in the sense that even the most candid and obvious continuity lags are forgivable, seeing how well they actually adhere to the unfolding of events. Reno continually watches the winos outside his apartment from time to time like a hateful cruel reminder of the results of his artistic failure; that he could end up just like them. The use of occasional hallucinations and dream sequences as well as the use of Douglas Metro’s paintings in Reno’s apartment all contributed in the artistic form of the movie, as well as the all time favorite reoccurring red theme which would all contribute to the foreshadowing violence ahead (the reoccurring image of Reno being sprayed with blood was dirty enough to keep me in awe). The acting, for the most part was average, but highly down to Earth as the characters were all brought into light with the actor’s dialogue and actions (Pamela actually reminds me of a punk girl I know today), the bums Reno runs into are all highly believable and well improvised and of course Abel Ferrara starring as the main character was quite a treat, bringing his anger and depression to the screen with personally lucid sharpness.

Driller Killer has a lot of style to it any way you look at it. There were various scenes that just made the movie feel greater than it already is, such as when Reno is presented with a dead rabbit for dinner and as he dresses up with lipstick and lingerie before going on a new drilling spree. Although I did get a little tired with the incessant band as we received various shots of them just being their annoying and intolerable selves (when they weren’t inadvertently bugging Reno, they bug the audience for reasons I don’t think Ferrara ever listed) and some of the drilling scenes might have needed a little more work in the process of creativity (what? No throat impaling?), they all contributed in the line of producing succinct grueling effects as well as some fun-with-drill-bits, so either way, the drillings were pretty cool. I found it hard to find something not to like about the movie as it said something about the human mind, how it can bend around circumstances until it wears out, as well as just about every theme within the movie being hard not to ignore. The poor bums might not have deserved the deaths since no one wants to live on the streets forever, but that is exactly where the ending of misery pops into the film, as well as the character’s cleverness, taking his anger out on those not as missed in society as others would. As a striving literary artist, I found the film’s theme of failure of artistic success being sparred with someone else’s annoying yet more successful art form to be as equally and personally powerful; it’s one of the cruelties of life and society that director Abel Ferrara has used in his work that applies so well in the Driller Killer. It’s violent, gritty, personal and enriching…check it out.

The DVD
I couldn’t help myself once I saw what this DVD really contained aside from one of my new favorite low budget serial killer horror films: a second disc featuring the early short films of director Abel Ferrara! How can one resist the temptation of watching one of the greatest realist cinema director’s early work in the film industry? Starting with the Driller Killer disc though, it really is a pretty good one as the transfer isn’t crystal clear, but hardly anything is obscure to our eyes. Most DVD commentary you run across is somewhat formal and informative, am I correct? Well, alright, perhaps I am not, but Abel Ferrara’s commentary on the film is not so much non-informative or informal as it is informative, slightly enlightening and quite humorous. He brings the facts and opinions up most of the time, as well as bringing some random light to whatever is on screen with jivy spontaneous comments, which really brings you into his mentality. Delving into his early short films, I began to appreciate his settings, themes and style of commentary, regardless of the fact that many background noises were heard alongside his dialogue. We got a better sense of Abel and where he comes from with his own personal stories, experiences with other actors and the mundane world around him. The shorts themselves, (Could this be Love and The Hold Up) were quite tangible as we get succinct yet down-to-earth feelings for some of the characters involved and their actions. The short entitled Nicky’s Film was ultimately intriguing as it’s a fortuitously/inadvertently silent movie with surreal themes involved and the theatrical trailer for Nine Lives of a Wet Pussy was great, seeing that you could still see Ferrara’s style of filming amidst the adult theme. In short, the second DVD is quite a find as it brings Ferrara’s mentality and first few films available to the audience, as well as a great horror film that’s worth the money digitally released from Cult Epics.

The Conclusion
Seeing that this is the first movie AND (multiple) DVD review I am offering as viewer sacrifice, I would have to say that the combination is great enough to be recommended for just about everyone interested in either discs.




Don’t Look in the Basement

Posted by Josh Samford On August - 26 - 2008
Originally written by Prof. Aglaophotis


Plot Outline: Dr. Stephen’s Sanitarium – a recovery home for the mentally ill where the patients are granted various liberties to roam freely around the home, granted they stay close, do their chores and adhere to the good doctor’s unique method of treatment that doesn’t so much as cure them par-se, but enables them to push their insanity levels around so they can categorize them; they may have their old tendencies, but they would be much less harmful to others in society than before their extensive treatment. This is where our story begins, when the only other supervisors are left to look after the patients after Dr. Stephens is distracted and accidentally killed by being struck in the back with an axe during the patient Judge’s personal stress relieving treatment. Unfortunately what distracts him was the nurse who had been planning to leave within the remains of the day. However, after the patient Harriet is enticed into thinking that the nurse took her baby (a doll she continuously treats like her own child), she attacks the nurse eventually killing her. Soon after, the new nurse Charlotte Beale arrives to be introduced to the sole surviving supervisor of the three in the staff, Dr. Geraldine Masters as well as the other patients residing in the home: Judge Cameron, Harriet, Sam, Danny, Allyson, Jennifer, Sgt. Jaffee and old Mrs. Callingham. However, during her stay, some of the patients try to warn her of something terrible going on there that is beyond control. As terrible things continually happen there, Charlotte realizes that the patients know what they’re talking about and she finds herself dedicated to finding the truth…but truth is certainly stranger than fiction now isn’t it?


  

The Review
Personally, I have always enjoyed the persona of a twisted human being. In fact, not just one individual, but many twisted people; it almost seems as though in a play or film, the actor can almost never go wrong when displaying such a person, partly due to the fact that they are real and that they are made the way they are in real ways. I’ve found that there really is something truly remarkable about a movie consisting mostly of the mentally ill and chronically dangerous; the way each individual acts, how their own personal stories consist of traumatizing events and self-pity that is depressing and sometimes too fantastic to believe, but alarmingly down to Earth. That’s certainly a primary aspect that Don’t Look in the Basement has going for it that it uses fully, yet oddly omits in various little portions like a nearly completed puzzle. And yet, the final result is still marveling to gaze at; it’s a different look through the doorway of the human mind and how far it can be pulled out before it finally gives. The movie obviously has a limited budget, but it was used fairly well as the movie itself did not entirely require the advancement of an actual hospital, although it might have skipped out on some clarifying scenes, it still takes what it has and uses it with remarkable potential (not the best potential, but still remarkable). One of the only real complaint coming from me however is the simple fact that the movie states a warning: ‘don’t look in the basement,’ and yet the warning is almost never evident in the movie. It seems to take a minor role instead of actually taking the full setting of the movie (such as Don’t Go in the House, but I digress).

With a story as obviously huge as Jason and the Argonauts turns out to be, you would probably expect it to have a relatively relaxed pace and go the usual route of a true epic, but the film doesn’t hold to such standards. Rather, it moves along at a jaunting speed at just over 104 minutes, and never once proves to be boring which suits the film extremely well. Rather than trying to discern every little fact of the story to the audience, the director chooses to give us the juiciest details and always skips to the good stuff, which is exactly what an action adventure yarn like this should do. It may not go for the jugular in presenting an authentic Greek tale, but it more than delivers in the entertainment department, which is truly where the film was meant to shine. After Jason initially sets out on his quest for the Golden Fleece, the film just feels like adventure after adventure, and that is exactly what it turns out to be. It loses only an ounce of steam when Jason is introduced to a romantic interest (sad to say, but every film has to have one), but quickly picks things back up with Harryheusen delivering some of his most mind blowing work of the era. Jason fighting with the hydra was a standout, but the biggest bit of animation is obviously when the argonauts take on a team of skeletons who are awaken from the grave to do battle. The scene is quite famous by now, and for good reason. The skeletons may not be the largest or most mind blowing creatures The Argonauts fight in the film, but from a technical scale it’s probably the biggest achievement. The claymation and the live action are well placed together and it proves to be the most realistic battle in the film. The skeletons have shadows that dance around them as they fight, and it actually looks as if the swords really do clash. It’s a beautifully orchestrated dance that proves to be one of those crowning achievements that are never forgotten. Whether Harryhausen will be remember for the duel or the actual film is debatable, but if you ask me, it truly is an achievement in cinema from all corners and deserves to be remembered as so.

The cinematography was amazingly well crafted as the close ups of the patient’s faces seemed to emit a brief sense of claustrophobia as they ranted on vociferously and creepily. The music seemed to consist of peaceful notes from a flute that would shift appropriately to easy long shakes of a maraca and some mystique arose through the picking at the strings of a sitar. The diction was somewhat nerve-wracking, but in no way incredulous as it fit the personalities of the crazy characters nicely, from the impetuously obnoxious laughter of Danny to the screams of loneliness from the bipolar Allyson. I say nerve-wracking only to implicate the vociferousness of all of the loud characters or the ones with the most dialogue (even Judge contributes to this for when he’s not continually introducing himself and treating life like a court room, he’s looking surprisingly creepy and talking vaguely, yet simultaneously threatening). With this in mind, the acting was surprisingly convincing, the only down fall being that a single lobotomy patient Sam, as childish as he acted, still had normal actions and dialogue after his surgery which seemed a little questionable and even the climax seemed slightly questionable only due to a lack of different scenes that would clarify the vagueness, but even those aspects did not entirely deter from any lack of enjoyment. There also seemed to be an evident sense of research done for the characters in the movie as (although not entirely elucidated on) most of the disorders of the patients seemed to connect well with actual disorders, mostly intermittent explosive and posttraumatic stress disorders. Everyone else, though somewhat vague, are inferable due to the depth of the characters; their individual behavior, dialogue, facial expressions and the like; so much to the point that the viewer can easily get a vicarious sense of sympathy for some of them. Perhaps another great aspect about this film was the violence involved in certain scenes. Although if the budget was higher, I’m sure the violence would all be onscreen, but what was put on screen was rather effective as I could recall briefly cringing in discouragement (and delight) at the violence employed.

The Conclusion
Despite its uniqueness, Don’t Look in the Basement might not get entirely well recognized over the years, but it certainly is entertaining to watch. I’m sure there are many ways that it could’ve been done better, particularly the further depth of each character so that the audience can actually become more familiar with everyone rather than a select few. But what it does have to offer it uses fully and makes for very interesting and creepy low budget psychological horror/mystery. What’s more, it also has a strong level of believability with the crazy characters introduced, no matter how shallow their pasts were presented. If you’re looking for something obscure, unsettling and with a good use of character credibility, Don’t Look in the Basement wouldn’t be a bad choice.


Dracula’s Daughter

Posted by Josh Samford On August - 26 - 2008
Originally written by Prof. Aglaophotis


Plot Outline: Having just defeated no one other than Count Dracula himself, Professor Von Helsing is arrested by the police authorities on accusations of murder. Naturally enough, nobody believes the good-hearted professor, whose stories of vampirism have always been regarded as unfounded superstition. The only person who can prevent Von Helsing from facing prison time and who can defend him in court is Dr. Jeffrey Garth, one of Von Helsing’s former brightest students. The case complicates itself even further when the corpse of Count Dracula, which in the meantime was being detained by the police, mysteriously disappears without a trace. No one could have ever dreamt that it was Dracula’s daughter herself, the Countess Marya Zaleska, who stole the cadaver. Seems that the Countess wanted to make sure that her blood-sucking daddy was really killed after all. After that she cremates his body, Countess Zaleska is fully ready to start a new life; a life without any attachments to her father and completely free of evil and darkness. To her dismay, the Countess however realises that she can’t escape her fate in any way and is doomed to be a vampire for life; or more accurately, for eternity. It is only after hypnotising and assaulting a young woman in her own house that Dr. Garth, who had befriended the Countess at a party, becomes aware of her true origins. And like his mentor Profs. Von Helsing would do, he sets out to stop this evil once and for all. His journey eventually takes him to Transylvania, where Count Dracula once lived, and where his daughter now resides. The final confrontation between Dr. Garth and Dracula’s daughter will decide the fate of all humanity.


  

The Review
Following the success of 1931’s Dracula starring Bela Lugosi, it was only a matter of time before Universal would come up with a sequel to the horror classic. This sequel eventually came out 5 years later, titled Dracula’s Daughter. And by Jove, let me just start by saying that it turned out to be a movie of the highest calibre, completely worthy of being regarded as a continuation to Dracula. I use the word “continuation” because this is what the movie essentially is; its frame of events taking place just seconds after the original (pretty much like the relationship that Halloween 2 has with John Carpenter’s original). Those expecting to see Bela Lugosi again in this sequel will however be disappointed, as the Count makes an appearance approximately totalling 1 whole second (practically it’s just a shot of him lying in his coffin with a stake driven in his heart in the first few minutes of the movie). This time round is Gloria Holden who takes the spotlight and let me tell you, she’s one of the most memorable female vampires ever to grace the big screen in the history of cinema. Her undisputable acting talent, coupled with her very apparent charisma give the right tragic feel to her character. From the very first second that you see her on screen, with her face covered in a veil and her big dark eyes looking menacingly at the cowardly policeman, you’ll know that Holden was born to play this role.

I also have to admit that I’m always a bit wary when coming to review a film which is nearly 70 years old, such as this one right here. The reason for me stating so is that your particular appreciation of such a movie will probably very much depend on your age. I don’t want to sound like a reviewer full of prejudice, but still I must state that younger audiences who are used to endless gore and flashy effects may find this film dull and uninteresting. Of course I’m not saying that every young individual is like that; I myself am 22 years old and love this movie to death. But while many movies can be regarded as timeless classics, that doesn’t mean that they will appeal to everyone. And Dracula’s Daughter, much like its predecessor, takes its time to tell its story. The movie is filled with dialogue and doesn’t have any sort of action, except maybe at the end (if you can call a bloke shooting two arrows with a crossbow action, that is). Naturally enough, this is not to say that the movie is weak. On the contrary, its principle strength lies in its subtle approach to drag us into the story and never let us go until it’s over. One could say that they don’t do movies like this anymore these days, and one would be totally right. It’s laughable and tragic at the same time when you see a movie like Stephen Sommers’ Van Helsing, whose primary objective was supposedly to pay tribute to the Universal monster movies in the first place, turn up to be the exact opposite of these classics. With flashy effects replacing smart dialogue and Dracula himself being very close to a buffoon, Sommers should have just gone and pissed on the graves of Lugosi, Karloff and all the others; and he would have probably insulted them less. A movie like Van Helsing is living proof of the sad state the horror movie industry in Hollywood is facing these days. It seems that no one has the necessary balls to build a horror movie entirely on dialogue and genuine suspense, as Dracula’s Daughter definitely is. So, in essence, for those of you who loved Van Helsing, I recommend you tay away from this movie. You may be shocked to discover that Van Helsing himself is not even a young, acrobatic womaniser equipped with all kinds of high-tech shit, but just a frail old man with thick eyeglasses; and that his first name is not even Gabriel but Abraham. If there is anything in this world that I hate more than vanilla coke, it’s the bastardisation of classic horror icons for the scope of earning a quick buck. Unlike Van Helsing, Dracula’s Daughter is driven by a brilliant screenplay and numerous quotable lines. Particularly noteworthy is Profs. Von Helsing’s speech on the ever-changing relationship between science and superstition, that the superstition of yesterday many times turns out to be the science of today. And who can forget the ever-classic line?: “I never drink… wine” (also used in Francis Ford Coppola’s version of Dracula).

The Conclusion
It’s also particularly important to point out that the screenplay to Dracula’s Daughter is top-notch not only for its memorable quotes but also for its overall theme. This was in fact probably the very first movie which showed a vampire in conflict with her fate. The movie presents a woman who does her best to escape her destiny, in vain. It presents a man, in Profs. Von Helsing, who accepted his fate of devoting his life to destroying vampires to the fullest, but who still has to face serious charges from all the people who refuse to believe him. Lastly, it also presents another man in the form of Dr. Garth who’s still undecided on what his fate consists of. His relationship with his personal assistant is quite confusing; the two of them gave me the impression that they’re undecided on whether they are good friends, two people in love with each other, or just two working partners. It is only at the end when Dr. Garth is driven to an extreme situation where he has to take a literal life-or-death decision. This movie is in fact all about these decisions and their consequent responsibilities. Decisions which shape the very core of our destiny. Decisions which, once taken, cannot be undone. It’s a movie which, apart from being entertaining, provides some serious food for thought. Highly recommended for all serious movie buffs out there (and for all those who hated Van Helsing).


Dracula Has Risen From the Grave

Posted by Josh Samford On August - 26 - 2008
Originally written by Prof. Aglaophotis


Plot Outline: A year has passed since Count Dracula was defeated in Transylvania; yet the townsfolk still seem to believe that his evil hasn’t been completely defeated. For this purpose, the Monsignor decides to go and exorcise Dracula’s castle. Equipped with a crucifix and accompanied by the local priest, he heads for the hills to get rid of this evil once and for all. Unfortunately for them things soon take an unexpected turn when the local priest hurts himself and accidentally spills some of his blood on Dracula’s hidden grave, waking the latter from his sleep. As Dracula comes back to life, he wastes no time in wreaking havoc on the town inhabitants once again; and after making a sensual local bartender his slave, he decides to seduce Maria, the Monsignor’s niece. The Monsignor’s only hope in saving his niece lies in Maria’s boyfriend Paul, who swears to protect Maria with his own life. The final confrontation between Paul and Count Dracula will determine the fate of all the people of Transylvania.


  

The Review
Among the countless horror figures the film industry exploited throughout the years, there is no doubt that Dracula is the most popular and immortal icon of them all. From Max Schreck to Bela Lugosi to Christopher Lee to Gary Oldman, and more recently resurrected yet again in Wes Craven’s Dracula 2000 and in the upcoming Van Helsing; Dracula has steadily grown to be the most popular vampire and horror character of all time. Yet, no matter how many more Dracula versions will continue to exist in the future (seeing Hollywood’s continuous fascination in milking every last drop from a franchise); I will always remain to cherish two particular versions of Dracula in my heart. And these are Bela Lugosi and Christopher Lee. I don’t think I need to expand on the greatness of Lugosi, as every respectable horror movie fanatic should know who he is and what he contributed to the vampire genre for several years to come. In the case of Christopher Lee, he managed to become a horror legend back in the 50’s, 60’s and 70’s thanks to his Dracula Hammer films. And I dare say that every inch of success he obtained was well deserved; given the fact that he created one of the most charismatic vampires in cinema history. In my book, no Saruman or Count Dooku would ever come close to the coolness that was Count Dracula.

Dracula has risen from the grave is actually the fourth film in the whole Hammer series (which can boast of a total of eight entries), and one of the seven films out of all these to feature Christopher Lee. Ironically enough, the producers had no choice but to make the second instalment, Brides Of Dracula, without Lee; the reason being that Lee himself was afraid of type-casting at the time. He seemed to eventually change his mind over time since he then came back for no less than six sequels. Many fans of these movies seem to agree that Dracula has risen from the grave is the last real good entry into the series. It is actually a very good film in its own right, made back in the days when atmosphere was preferred to false scares and suspense was preferred to giving petty theories on why Dracula acts the way he does. This is as a matter of fact one of the main gripes I have with several modern versions. Remember the ending to Dracula 2000 and all that Judas Escariot nonsense? Many horror movies nowadays try too hard to construct an interesting story, and seem to forget that their primary reason of existence should be to frighten the unsuspecting viewer as effectively as possible. The Hammer Film producers were definitely aware of this, and Dracula has risen from the grave is living proof. The film doesn’t give us any information on Dracula’s background and evil origins, partly because it’s a sequel and partly because this was the way many horror movies were approached back in the days. As soon as Dracula is out of his grave he immediately jumps into action, without any clear motives except for the fact he wanted to seek some sort of revenge on the Monsignor that tried to exorcise his castle. This is actually quite secondary to the whole premise though. All we need to know is that he’s Count Dracula and he’s an evil force. If we acknowledge just that, we are almost guaranteed to enjoy the movie. There is absolutely nothing wrong with this, and I think it even helps to make the entire Dracula mystique all the more frightening. One of the golden rules I’ve learned from my experience in watching horror movies is that the less you know about the villain, the more scary the movie will turn out to be. Just compare Halloween to its sequels as one example.

Surprisingly, this movie also featured a recurring sexual element in it; and it’s one of the first movies responsible to introduce the concept of the seductive vampire. There is absolutely no form of nudity in it; yet the film still fells strangely erotic in some places, particularly evidenced by the clothes worn by the female bartender and the sensual face expression of a female character lead when she’s bitten by Dracula. The film manages to be sexy without feeling the need to include sex, also partly thanks to the natural beauty of Veronica Carlson, whom director Freddie Francis successfully exploits every angle of her charm to full effect.

The film’s flaws are quite minor, and they usually have to do with some plot-holes or continuity errors. For example, it is never explained why Dracula didn’t order the priest to take off the crucifix attached on his castle the first time he sees it. Instead, he decides to leave it there for no apparent reason; and when he goes back to the castle at the end of the film, he quickly orders Maria to take it off herself. This factor should be quite noteworthy since it will eventually influence Dracula’s fate. Another thing I noticed happens during the chase scene between Dracula and Zena. This scene should’ve taken place at night; yet the shots seem to jump from dark night to early dawn continously. And I never fully understood where the first victim hidden in the church bell came from, since Dracula was still sleeping for over a year when the bell ringer finds the body.

The Conclusion
Such trivial inconsistencies shouldn’t nonetheless stop you from enjoying such a well-made vampire movie. When you hear James Bernard’s haunting score in the opening credits, when you see Christopher Lee light the screen with his presence, when you experience a movie filled with such eerie atmosphere; you know you have just found a long- forgotten little gem.



Don’t Open Till Christmas

Posted by Josh Samford On August - 26 - 2008


Originally written by Prof. Aglaophotis

Plot Outline: Something odd is happening in foggy London nearing Christmas time. Someone has initiated a nightly killing spree and the targets: Santa Claus! Any inebriated or fun loving fellow dressed as Saint Nick gets killed and it’s up to (New) Scotland Yard in order to figure out who the killer is. With the help of witnesses and Kate, the daughter of the second dead Santa, as well as a shady newspaper reporter, Scotland Yard’s finest Inspector Harris and Sergeant Powell unfortunately haven’t much time until Christmas Day while the bodies keep piling up, red herrings are falsely accused and odd tips are taken into scrutinizing accounts. Will our protagonists and supporting characters reveal the killer? Or will they be indiscriminately murdered by the Santa killer?


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